Touching Up Satin Stainless

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by pokute, May 5, 2015.

  1. pokute

    pokute Sincere as a $5 funeral

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    I have been preparing a bunch of guns for sale and learned a few interesting things about touching-up.

    Satin stainless is very easily marred, but is also very easily refinished. Very light work by hand with ScotchBrite will do it. Get a couple of different grades of ScotchBrite, and always start with the finest grade. Work in one direction, using gentle, long strokes. If the finish is too bright with the fine grade, proceed to the next coarser grade until the finish is matched. It is nearly impossible to mess up doing this, because any errors can be fixed immediately by simply going over with the ScotchBrite again. The process is very forgiving and very easy. Long straight strokes with only slight pressure is the key.

    Another trick I just learned is for refinishing old stained grips and stocks. First clean the surface by soaking in acetone for a couple of hours and then brushing with a firm toothbrush - Make certain that the toothbrush is not soluble in the acetone first! Then mix up a weak solution of Oxalic Acid in water (Sold at hardware stores as "wood bleach"), and soak for a minute in this solution while scrubbing with the toothbrush. This will even out the color somewhat, but more importantly it will "raise the grain".

    After the stocks are completely dry, sand very gently with very fine sanding sponge (1000 grit) - All you are trying to do is to remove the "fur" that the acid raised. Lastly, rub in pure Tung Oil with your fingers. You should immediately get a deep, satiny finish. The Tung Oil can be repeated at weekly intervals. Pure Tung Oil will not get sticky or shiny.

    Lastly, sometimes a blued gun will develop haze or rust spots. These can often be safely rubbed out with 0000 steel wool wet with light oil. Again, rub gently so as not to mar the bluing. A badly spotted blued gun with little collector value may be smartened up to a surprising degree by using a little Brownell's Oxpho blue on 0000 steel wool after degreasing both the gun and steel wool with acetone. follow up with oiled steel wool. Heating to about 250F significantly improves the process.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2015
  2. Geezer

    Geezer New Member

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    Great tips. I use bronze wool to tidy up blemishes. It is very forgiving and removes small rust freckles easily. Steel wool can sometimes leave small particles of steel that can rust.