Reloading supplies

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by cloaker, Oct 14, 2014.

  1. cloaker

    cloaker Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I am looking into reloading since I am shooting 750+ rounds a week I can see a time when reloading will be a necessity rather than a luxury, so diving into the internet for research I am steering towards Dillon 550B setup which I think it pretty good from what I've been told and read.

    Now, I'm trying to figure out the cost of a 45 acp round and for the life of me, no one sells winchester 231 powder and the bullets themselves are like 20 cents each!

    Am I just screwed because of the market or am I missing that magic website that actually has product. I did find 1 guy selling 4 lbs of winchester 231 for about 300$ and for that price, I can buy 45 acp rounds at bass pro!

    Anyone know where I can buy some of that winchester 231?

    David
     
  2. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Well-Known Member

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    It's been extremely tough buying reloading supplies for several years now,it's just in the last year or so got to the point where it's starting to rebound a little but finding things at reasonable prices is still a little tricky. Supplies usually don't last to long.You just have to be at the right place at the right time from what I'm still seeing. Maybe others are having better luck.
     

  3. pokute

    pokute Sincere as a $5 funeral

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    +1 to what squirrelhunter said. Right now, a little patience will eventually pay off. Roze Distribution sells the very fine Zero swaged and jacketed bullets at very good prices, and they usually have SOME 45 acp in stock.

    You should consider more than one powder, and thereby improve your chances of finding something. For 45 - 231 (also sold as HP-38), Unique, AA#5 are all terrific powders. Bullseye and 700X will do in a pinch.

    We have no primer shortage in Los Angeles. Powders have been pretty easy to come by during the last month, as long as you have a second and third choice. No problem getting bullets right now. Local folks should check out Bain & Davis and the Angeles Range reloading store (best source in L.A. county).
     
  4. cloaker

    cloaker Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I've decided to load 45 first and work both range and defense ammo. I don't need a lot of defense ammo but I want to be prepared in the event that this is what I will need to reload.

    I still can't find w 231 or hp-38 anywhere but I am looking so I am glad to read your other thoughts. I've also been digging thru the lyman reloading handbook, reading it and I think I've found the right info for the reloading I want to do.

    I've attached pictures since everyone likes pictures!

    So if I find the right bullet, I can use any of those listed powders as long as I follow the stated grains? I don't want to own 20 different types of powders...yet... but that is also why I'm only going to do the 45 to start. If I had to only chose one type of 45 it would be the defense ammo. I'm hoping that the casing is the same for hp and non-hp 45?

    Dave
     

    Attached Files:

  5. pokute

    pokute Sincere as a $5 funeral

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    Yes, same brass. The one important thing about loading 45acp is that you should NOT follow the OAL data! You should seat the bullets to the correct depth, as opposed to OAL. The usual rule of thumb is to expose a "double thumbnail thickness" of bullet shoulder to start:

    [​IMG]

    That happens to be a 200gr SWC. Note that the nose can never engage the rifling, so the nose plays no part in determining correct seating depth, but must not stick out so far that it won't fit in a magazine! The round in the picture has about as hard a crimp as can be used in a 45 pistol.

    It's a little harder to see the correct seating depth with jacketed ammo, but the rule is the same. Keep in mind that the 45acp "headspaces on the case mouth", which means that the forward edge of the brass keeps the round from getting shoved in to an arbitrary depth by the cycling of the gun. The limit to OAL is the magazine - The cartridge needs to fit in the magazine. Once you have determined the correct OAL for a particular bullet, seat all of that type of bullet to the same seating OAL. Note that I am using OAL instead of "seating depth"... That's because you can measure OAL. Calipers are an absolute necessity for reloading.

    Crimping is kind of an art, unfortunately. The most important thing is to size and crimp adequately to prevent bullet setback (where the bullet sinks into the case), which results in increased pressure and POSSIBLY a kaboom. Using a powder that fills the case fairly well is NOT a way to prevent this, as the bullet will still be able to setback a surprising amount by compressing the powder.

    The real, genuine, correct, best seating depth for 45acp is determined using the "plunk test" on the barrel of the gun you are loading for, but explaining it is too much effort. One part of the plunk test that you can make use of right off the mark is to make sure that jacketed bullets are seated deep enough. Remove the barrel from your gun, drop a loaded round into the barrel. It should not stick out past the barrel hood, and should in fact be exactly flush with the barrel hood, or your bullet is seated too far out (or your brass is oversize, which is extremely rare with 45 acp in my experience).

    Lead bullets are easier to work with because the action can force them into the lands a bit if they are seated slightly too long. Swaged lead bullets are vastly better than hard cast because they are usually completely free of voids, flat based, and soft enough to obturate fully. They shoot noticeably better. They make good SD rounds too - Hitting like the proverbial flying ashtray. I highly recommend the ZERO swaged bullets. Hornady 230gr swaged roundnose bullets are also excellent, but a bit more expensive.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2014