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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I noticed on the physical description, it said it was not perforated. Would this not make it burn faster, or would it make the granules turn to powder to easy?
You didn't say which powder, but perforations increase burn rate, though not just for the simple reason usually given: "Increase surface area".

If the powder is cylindrical and perforated (like the macaroni in Kraft macaroni and cheese), then the primary effect is increased surface area, and also increasing surface area on the inner surface to counteract reducing surface area on the outside - Resulting in more regular burn rate.

If the powder is a flat flake and perforated, the burn rate is increased for complex reasons related to the greater exposed edge. Flakes with holes are pretty rare, because the same effect can be achieved by reducing the size of the flakes. The equipment available in some factories favors perforations, however.

Smokeless powder is not "friable", meaning that it doesn't tend to break up or erode to create powder easily. Some powders DO have fine powder mixed with them due to clumsy processing, and it should be removed before use. See Phil Sharpe's Book for details.
 

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Sincere as a $5 funeral
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Sincere as a $5 funeral
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks,Mon! Well explained. The only reloading I've ever done is shotgun shells. I used to shoot competition skeet when I was in the Navy, and always tried to shoot about 400 rounds 3 out of 4 weeks.
Flying Fish? Fighter planes? Seagulls?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Getting the hang of opening cans with a 44 takes a lot of practice. Tomato soup:
 

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