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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In this day and age when scales both electron (absolutely accurate) and conventional are extremely accurate the easiest way to triple check if your own reloaded ammunition has powder in the case or NOT is to actually weigh the finished round. I know that i mostly use 125Gr projectiles, plus my Dillon press is set to deliver 4.0 grns of powder. Dillon and Lee presses are extremely accurate in the delivery of powder. Hence the 9mm Winchester case weighs 62 grns (or other brands), my projectile 125grns and 4grn powder. So, if i think i failed to load one round correctly i can set my scale at 189 grns allowing for +/- variance and i weigh each round and if the scale reads below 189grns there MAY be an issue. Just went out to my loading room, checked a few rounds and it it looks like it should work. Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes a very accurate scale is essential. However it is one way. This photo i use to stress to new shooters the consequence of not knowing what a squib rounds sounds like. Note this picture was of a barrel cut away, count the rounds. Someone totally unaware. Also there really is no reason to know the weight of each component, just isolate a complete round that weighs less by 2/3 or 4 gains. However if one reloads there is NO way they would not known projectile weight and manufacturers are spot om with wight of projectile. Try it with 124 grn hollow point.
 

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In theory it should work…however, I’ve weighed my bullets and they can vary by a slight amount, add that to variations in case weight and no loaded round would be the same. Pistol rounds use so little powder that I’m not sure if It would be a reliable indicator…still, it’s an idea that’ll I’ll probably give it a try weighing things for consistency
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Totally agree with your assessment. I the absence of any other guide if one is uncertain it's there to use or reject. The only question i have to ask a person using a Dillon or lee press is, as long as there is powder in the hopper how can the case be empty of powder? There is on the market a device which alerts a user to an empty case if the hopper was empty, so the rest is up to us. If i was really concerned about this i would buy the best, most accurate powder measuring device, an electronic version not my scales even if i know my scales are great. Then if i was in dought i would not bother about the weight of the case or projectile but just weigh each completed round and put aside any round that was some 2 grns lighter or other aside. Might do that sometime just to see any variation of greater margin?
 

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Totally agree with your assessment. I the absence of any other guide if one is uncertain it's there to use or reject. The only question i have to ask a person using a Dillon or lee press is, as long as there is powder in the hopper how can the case be empty of powder? There is on the market a device which alerts a user to an empty case if the hopper was empty, so the rest is up to us. If i was really concerned about this i would buy the best, most accurate powder measuring device, an electronic version not my scales even if i know my scales are great. Then if i was in dought i would not bother about the weight of the case or projectile but just weigh each completed round and put aside any round that was some 2 grns lighter or other aside. Might do that sometime just to see any variation of greater margin?
I use a single stage press, so I reload in steps. After loading each case with powder I visually check each case…so for me it hasnt been an issue. But I can see why it can be for others that depend on the automated reload process…
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
With my Dillon press (square deal) which is a progressive 4 stage press i sit a little higher and i can see the case as it comes to station and gets a load of powder. I can see the case is near 1/2 full with the 4 grains of powder so if by some magic the load as light it still has enough powder in it to sent the projectile out of the barrel. I also have a Super Simplex single stage press for my .38 and .357 magnum or my .223 and the best i can do is around 50-60 rounds per hour. With my Dillon it's 400 + going steady and no rush.
 
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