JMB was a LOON!

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by pokute, Oct 19, 2014.

  1. pokute

    pokute Sincere as a $5 funeral

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    Haha, made you look!

    Seriously... The 1911 is a strange beast. I'm not sure that there have been more than 100 people in the last 100 years that understand it completely. I sure don't.

    Consider the lockup. The only thing I'm 100% sure of is that the barrel lugs should engage solidly with the slide lugs at full lockup, and the barrel should be pointing straight ahead and slightly downward, with just enough clearance at the top rear and bottom front of the bushing to let it cycle freely.

    Beyond that, there's a whole lot of mystery. The barrel bed, the vertical impact surface, the link and link pin, the barrel hood... I'm not convinced I understand the fitting of any of those. I don't think I have a single 1911 where anything impacts the vertical impact surface!

    The disconnector and thumb safety on the 1911 are two of the most mysterious looking things ever to be found in a gun. Once you understand how they work, they make perfect sense (kinda), but you just can't quite convince yourself that some demon didn't bump JMB's elbow while he was designing them - Those two parts make it impossible to describe the 1911 as a masterpiece of simplicity.

    Proof of the general inability of folks to get their heads around the 1911 comes in the form of statements generally like "It wasn't designed to be a target pistol...". Raise your hands, how many of you million people who have regurgitated that bit of nonsense has ever fired a prewar commercial 1911? Not a target pistol my aunt Fanny! In fact the original pre-Woodsman was less of a target pistol than the 1911. Guess which single gun has won more bullseye competitions than any other.

    JMB seems to have recovered in time to design the High Power (enough of it to show that he was through with links, anyway). Too bad it wasn't chambered for a decent round.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014