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I watched a REAL professional combat instructor doing a private training session once. He put out a piece of paper with a diamond, heart, club, and spade on it and called the suit for the student to shoot. Not my kind of thing, but it seemed to really be working the student. Doing that with a shooting partner, taking turns, would be fun. My partner and I do speed drills at 40 yards. Having someone watching you keeps you honest, and keeps the pressure on. Yes, I AM bragging :p
 

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Hello,

On arriving home with my RO, I disassembled, cleaned and inspected. I placed a fair amount of LCP on the parts that are in contact and off I went for a test fire.

First time out, 100 rounds and no problems. Completely dependable. The gun is shooting low and left.

I disassembled and cleaned and lubricated with LCP again.

Yesterday I shot another 100 rounds at 25 yards for sight adjustment. I got it hitting at 25 yards more or less where I want it.

So far, I have zero malfunctions and it is shooting great patterns. Great patterns for me that is. :eek:

Bill
 

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Sincere as a $5 funeral
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Excellent report!

It's kind of hard to coach someone by wire, but here goes:

If your rear sight is now noticeably shifted to the right, you are "pushing" the trigger. A lot of folks correct a trigger problem by adjusting the sights, and sometimes even get remarkable consistency that way - But it's not productive.

It is actually a very sound practice to zero your sights doing real shooting, because it helps you diagnose trigger and grip issues. Sighting in using a rest is practically useless. The rest is for testing the grouping of the gun and load - It doesn't do anything to make you a better shooter.

To find out if you are pushing, Put a post-it with a small dot on it on the wall, and do some dry-fire practice. You will see the muzzle of the gun move very slightly. Even a very good shooter will have some slight movement at first. Practice until you get NO MOVEMENT AT ALL. The next time you shoot at the range, your first shot will show you where you really want your sights set. After a few shots you will start pushing again.

Takes a lot of dry-fire practice OR practice with a 22 to get good trigger control. The little Browning baby 1911 22 is a good practice gun, because it is intentionally scaled down to replicate the recoil motion of the 1911. Without the flash and boom, it is easier to concentrate on trigger control.
 
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