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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings to All,

This question may have been addressed previously; if so, my apology. Are there gun laws prohibiting modifying a handgun’s trigger pull force (for those of us with bad arthritis in both hands) - - specifically in Ohio? Have read, on the web, that some states prohibit making any mods.

Thanks in advance for any comments/guidance.
 

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I know that in court cases, attorneys can use gun mods against a person to make them look more sinister and blood thirsty. As far as actual laws go, each state is different. I would suggest contacting your local county prosecuting attorney's office or magistrates and get some guidance on applicable laws or at least where you can read up on them. Internet searches can also be useful, but just make sure the info is from a reliable source and up to date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know that in court cases, attorneys can use gun mods against a person to make them look more sinister and blood thirsty. As far as actual laws go, each state is different. I would suggest contacting your local county prosecuting attorney's office or magistrates and get some guidance on applicable laws or at least where you can read up on them. Internet searches can also be useful, but just make sure the info is from a reliable source and up to date.
Greetings WVSurveyor,
Many thanks for the very good information. If i can find out who my local assigned legal attorney is, i will pose that question to him/her. In the interim, i registered for a class (this September) on current gun laws for my state so perhaps that question may come up at that session. I posted this question on this forum because there are many forum members who are more knowledgeable on gun laws than i am. I know for a fact that in Ohio it is not legal to remove any identification on a handgun; such as the serial number but was not sure about minor mods. Here is an example: On one of my other handguns, a G19.5, the slide release tab is very small and is difficult to pull down to release the slide. I installed an aftermarket tab which is very slightly longer than the OEM and is much easier to grasp and pull down. This mod does not make me a faster shooter but is a mod nonetheless. So, in some states, any mod may be illegal. Let's assume that my state does not have any specific laws against mods. I made that small mod and am o.k. Now, i travel from the east coast to the west coast and am passing thru some states that do have laws against mods. Would i have to reconfigure my handgun to OEM status simply because i would be visiting that state and be under that state's gun laws?
WVSurveyor, many thanks for taking time to respond and comment - it is most appreciated.
 

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Greetings to All,

This question may have been addressed previously; if so, my apology. Are there gun laws prohibiting modifying a handgun’s trigger pull force (for those of us with bad arthritis in both hands) - - specifically in Ohio? Have read, on the web, that some states prohibit making any mods.

Thanks in advance for any comments/guidance.
I hope not cause I did a trigger job on my SP-101.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I hope not cause I did a trigger job on my SP-101.
Hello Miketx,
Yes, i did the same on my Hellcat (original - pre OSP version) but then i put back all the OEM parts; even the plastic striker sleeve. I think i got spooked by my own question. If i find out for certain that Ohio does not have any specific laws against mods, i may put the aftermarket spring kit back in; as it only takes about 20 minutes to do.
 

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Hello Miketx,
Yes, i did the same on my Hellcat (original - pre OSP version) but then i put back all the OEM parts; even the plastic striker sleeve. I think i got spooked by my own question. If i find out for certain that Ohio does not have any specific laws against mods, i may put the aftermarket spring kit back in; as it only takes about 20 minutes to do.
Incidentally, if you send a gun in to Ruger for repair that has been modified they will change it back to the way it came from the factory.
 

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I actually i would have thought the quickest way to establish what if any modification on any pistol are in line with the law is to ask a local gunsmith.
Gunsmiths repair and make modification, they know in each state what they are allowed. That is how they make their living.
Also all pistols come with springs and such and they wear out. There are numerous manufacturers of pistol parts, the most popular would be recoil springs and main springs.
This here is not regarded as a modification, yet just changing them out make a massive difference to recoil and ease of trigger control. Or even fitting a red dot as one gets older makees the
ease of sight acquisition simple.
 

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As an addendum to my last post if modifications are an issue, what about a hollow point round that is more likely to kill than a standard round? Some of the
modern rounds are absolutely designed to maximize injury and death. Removing serial numbers has always been illegal in most places.
Or shortening barres or making a weapon auto instead of semi auto. Changing out springs is not what is considered here as wanting to inflict more pain and injury to an attacker.
It's the ammunition that does that, so why don't state governments insist on chocolate projectiles, lol.
 

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what about a hollow point round that is more likely to kill than a standard round? Some of the
modern rounds are absolutely designed to maximize injury and death.
That's absolutely something that lawyers have tried to use against someone in court. But there is always the retort that hollow points will expand, not penetrate as far and therefore reduce the risk of exiting and hitting someone or something else. After that, it's up to the judge or jury.
I agree that changing springs and other parts that wear out would not be considered modifications, that is if they were original replacement parts or matched the specs of the factory part. I'm sure that any lawyer worth his/her salt would make a case that reduced springs, upgraded sights or red dots, or anything that would enhance a weapons ease of use and application, especially on a pistol intended for self defense, was intentionally done in order to inflict more damage and harm. It wouldn't matter that the mods were perfectly legal, it's about influencing minds and opinion. They will use whatever they can to try and win for their client and obtain the monetary reward.
 

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Some of the
modern rounds are absolutely designed to maximize injury and death.
Nope, hollow points were created to expand thereby slowing down after impact to prevent over penetration and reduce the odds of traveling through the body and striking an innocent person. No one has ever been prosecuted for defending themselves with a hollow point.
 

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That's absolutely something that lawyers have tried to use against someone in court. But there is always the retort that hollow points will expand, not penetrate as far and therefore reduce the risk of exiting and hitting someone or something else. After that, it's up to the judge or jury.
I agree that changing springs and other parts that wear out would not be considered modifications, that is if they were original replacement parts or matched the specs of the factory part. I'm sure that any lawyer worth his/her salt would make a case that reduced springs, upgraded sights or red dots, or anything that would enhance a weapons ease of use and application, especially on a pistol intended for self defense, was intentionally done in order to inflict more damage and harm. It wouldn't matter that the mods were perfectly legal, it's about influencing minds and opinion. They will use whatever they can to try and win for their client and obtain the monetary reward.
High probability that an attorney would focus first on the name of the weapon, its possible implications to evil, and why you chose it prior to evaluating whether you replaced some springs in the mechanism. Much easier sell to a jury, no expert witness required to explain technical idiosyncrasies that no one but a gunsmith or an engineer would fully understand. So, there is that...
 

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Nope, hollow points were created to expand thereby slowing down after impact to prevent over penetration and reduce the odds of traveling through the body and striking an innocent person. No one has ever been prosecuted for defending themselves with a hollow point.
That's one way of looking at it, with the no penetration argument. No argument there but the massive damage internally to the alleged Bad Guy or Girl is anther story.
 
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