MantisX

Discussion in 'Concealed Carry' started by ThreeTango, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. ThreeTango

    ThreeTango Moderator Staff Member

    1,445
    26
    38
  2. RevV

    RevV Member Supporter

    414
    27
    28
    Interesting tech, but I don't need 1 $149 device to tell me that I am less steady than a vice.

    Anyone know the "wall drill" mentioned in the article?
     

  3. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

    3,605
    48
    48
    Yea...me neither.
     
  4. megafiddle

    megafiddle New Member

    43
    0
    0
    I've used the wall drill occasionally, though I didn't know it by any name. If I understand it correctly, it concentrates only on alignment of front and rear sights wilth each other and front sight focus, and ignores sight alignment with a target.

    http://pistol-training.com/drills/wall-drill

    The wall drill is good for working on trigger pull, where problems there typically show up in the form the two sights moving out of alignment with each other. This occurs when the gun twists or swivels off the sighting line, normally at the wrist. It's also easier to see misalignment against a blank surface.

    Maintaining alignment of the sights with the target, is somewhat different, and is more a matter of overall stability. Problems here show up in the form of the small random-like wandering of the front sight on the target, while the front and rear sight remain aligned with each other. This type of movement is more lateral, with a much smaller change in angle.

    There is another difference between these two types of sight alignment. When shooting from a standing position, with rear/front sight alignment maintained, a 1/16" movement of the front sight translates into a approx 2.5" at a 25 yd. target. This would be as if the arms, hands, and gun were acting as a solid unit, and pivoting at the shoulders. From the same position, if you were to jerk the trigger and move the front sight by 1/16", while keeping the rear sight on target, you would miss the target completely by up to about 2 feet (depending on sight radius).

    It's not clear if the mantisx differentiates between these two types of aiming errors, or if it provides such data. I think this would be important if the information is to be useful. One thing the mantisx cannot know is the initial point of aim at the instant you begin pulling the trigger. It only knows the movement from that point on (and for a short period previous). So it can only determine the size of aiming errors incurred during trigger pull. It cannot show group size, only potential group size.
     
  5. RevV

    RevV Member Supporter

    414
    27
    28
    Thank you, Megafiddle!
     
  6. megafiddle

    megafiddle New Member

    43
    0
    0
    Hope it was helpful.

    As you say, you don't really need it to tell you are wandering off target.

    For dry fire, you can simply watch the sights, and for live fire, you can simply look at the target.

    Also, that point of impact error of about 2 ft. that I mentioned should have been about 1 ft. Still quite a miss, nonetheless.
     
  7. megafiddle

    megafiddle New Member

    43
    0
    0
    It's an interesting use of technology. It looks like its based on the same accelerometers that are used in video games. These sense only motion, not position. So any positional information is in reference to some arbitrary starting position, and is calculated from there. In this case, that starting position is where the trigger pull begins.

    It also provides a "diagnosis" of the shots fired, and in that sense it is very much like the old NRA correction target.